GMAT Preparation Classes in Nepal

GMAT Preparation Classes in Nepal (2024)

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GMAT Preparation Classes in Nepal

MKSprep is best GMAT Preparation Classes in Nepal.

The Graduate Management Admission Test, or GMAT, is a standardized test that is widely used as a criterion for admission into graduate-level business programs such as MBA, Master of Finance, Master of Accounting, and others. The GMAT is a computer-adaptive test that measures your aptitude in verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing skills.
The GMAT is meant to test how well you can think critically, solve problems, look at data, and talk to people. It consists of four sections: Analytical Writing Assessment, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Verbal Reasoning. Each section is meant to test a different set of skills, and when the scores are added up, they give a full picture of your skills.

The GMAT Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)


The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) tests how well you can evaluate and analyze arguments and write clearly to get your point across. You will be given one topic and have to write an essay analyzing the argument presented on the topic. The essay will be scored on a scale of 0 to 6.

The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) section of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is designed to evaluate a test-takers ability to analyze an argument and effectively communicate their ideas in writing. This section consists of one essay question; you will have 30 minutes to complete it.
The AWA section is designed to test your proficiency in fundamental writing skills such as critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and effective communication. The question will present an argument, and you will be asked to analyze the argument and provide a well-reasoned critique of the argument’s logic and assumptions.
The AWA essay is scored on a scale of 0-6 by two independent readers, and the scores are then averaged to produce a final score. The AWA score is reported separately from the overall GMAT score, and many business schools use it as a factor in their admissions decisions.
To perform well in the AWA section, it is important to have a solid understanding of fundamental writing skills and to be able to apply them to the task of analyzing an argument. You should identify an argument’s strengths and weaknesses and communicate your ideas effectively in writing. Practice and preparation are essential to achieving a high score on the GMAT AWA section.
There are many resources available to help you prepare for the GMAT AWA section, including study guides, online courses, and practice tests. It is recommended that you begin preparing for the GMAT at least three months in advance and dedicate a significant amount of time to practicing writing essays in response to the types of prompts you will see on the test.
In conclusion, the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) section of the GMAT is an essential part of the test that evaluates a test-takers ability to analyze an argument and effectively communicate their ideas in writing. By developing a solid understanding of fundamental writing skills and practicing writing essays in response to the types of prompts you will see on the test, you can perform well on the GMAT AWA section and increase your chances of being accepted into your desired graduate-level business program.

The GMAT Integrated Reasoning (IR) section


The Integrated Reasoning (IR) section tests how well you can combine information from different sources, understand data in different formats, and judge information in different situations. The section consists of 12 questions, which are a mix of graphics interpretation, multi-source reasoning, two-part analysis, and table analysis.

The Integrated Reasoning (IR) section of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is designed to evaluate a test-takers ability to analyze and synthesize complex data from multiple sources and to solve complex problems using integrated reasoning skills. This section consists of 12 questions; you will have 30 minutes to complete it.
The IR section tests your proficiency in fundamental reasoning skills such as data interpretation, quantitative analysis, and logical reasoning. The questions will require you to analyze data presented in tables, charts, and graphs and to integrate that information to solve complex problems. The IR section is intended to test your ability to apply your knowledge of quantitative and analytical skills to real-world business scenarios.
The questions in the IR section are designed to test your ability to analyze and synthesize information from multiple sources, such as financial reports, marketing surveys, and market research. The section consists of four types of questions: multi-source reasoning, table analysis, graphics interpretation, and two-part analysis. The multi-source reasoning questions test your ability to evaluate information from multiple sources and to draw conclusions based on that information. The table analysis questions test your ability to analyze and interpret data presented in tables. The graphics interpretation questions test your ability to analyze and interpret data presented in graphs and charts. The two-part analysis questions test your ability to solve complex problems using integrated reasoning skills.
To perform well in the IR section, it is important to have a solid understanding of fundamental reasoning skills and to be able to apply them to complex data sets. You should also be able to identify relationships between different data sets and draw conclusions based on that information. Practice and preparation are essential to achieving a high score on the GMAT IR section.
There are many resources available to help you prepare for the GMAT IR section, including study guides, online courses, and practice tests. It is recommended that you begin preparing for the GMAT at least three months in advance and dedicate a significant amount of time to practicing the types of questions you will see on the test.
In conclusion, the Integrated Reasoning (IR) section of the GMAT is an essential part of the test that evaluates a test-takers ability to analyze and synthesize complex data from multiple sources and to solve complex problems using integrated reasoning skills. By developing a solid understanding of fundamental reasoning skills and practicing the types of questions you will see on the test, you can perform well on the GMAT IR section and increase your chances of being accepted into your desired graduate-level business program.

The GMAT Quantitative Reasoning (QR) section


The Quantitative Reasoning (QR) section measures your ability to reason mathematically, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphical data. There are 31 multiple-choice questions in this section. They cover topics like math, algebra, geometry, and data analysis.

The Quantitative Reasoning (QR) section of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is designed to evaluate a test-takers ability to reason mathematically, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphical data. This section consists of 31 multiple-choice questions; you will have 62 minutes to complete it.

The QR section is designed to test your proficiency in fundamental mathematical concepts such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and data analysis. The questions will vary in difficulty level; some require more advanced mathematical skills than others. However, the GMAT is not a test of advanced mathematical knowledge. Instead, it is designed to test your ability to apply basic mathematical concepts to real-world problems.

The questions in the QR section are designed to test your ability to apply quantitative skills to solve problems in different contexts. The section consists of two types of questions: problem-solving and data sufficiency. The problem-solving questions test your ability to solve problems by applying mathematical concepts. In contrast, the data sufficiency questions test your ability to analyze data and determine whether the given information is sufficient to solve a particular problem.

The QR section includes questions on various mathematical topics, including arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and data analysis. Some of the topics you can expect to see in the QR section include the following:

  • Basic arithmetic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
  • Fractions, decimals, and percentages
  • Algebraic equations and inequalities
  • Linear and quadratic equations
  • Coordinate geometry
  • Properties of triangles, circles, and other geometric shapes
  • Probability and statistics
  • Data analysis and interpretation

To perform well in the QR section, it is important to have a solid understanding of these concepts and to be able to apply them to solve problems efficiently. You need to practice and study to get a high score on the GMAT QR section.

There are many resources available to help you prepare for the GMAT QR section, including study guides, online courses, and practice tests. It is recommended that you begin preparing for the GMAT at least three months in advance and dedicate a significant amount of time to practicing the types of questions you will see on the test.

In conclusion, the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) section of the GMAT is an essential part of the test that evaluates a test-takers ability to apply mathematical concepts to real-world problems. You can do well on the GMAT QR section and increase your chances of getting into the graduate-level business program you want by getting a good grasp of basic math concepts and practicing the kinds of questions you will see on the test.

The GMAT Verbal Reasoning (VR) section


The Verbal Reasoning (VR) section tests your ability to understand written material, evaluate arguments, and use critical thinking skills. This part has 36 multiple-choice questions about things like reading comprehension, critical thinking, and correcting sentences.
The GMAT is a computer-adaptive test, which means that the difficulty of the questions you receive will be based on your performance on previous questions. If you answer a question correctly, the next question will be more straightforward, and if you answer a question incorrectly, the next question will be more explicit. This allows the test to adapt to your skill level and provide a more accurate assessment of your abilities.

The Verbal Reasoning (VR) section of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is designed to evaluate a test-takers ability to understand written material, evaluate arguments, and apply critical reasoning skills. This section consists of 36 multiple-choice questions; you will have 65 minutes to complete it.
The VR section aims to see how well you do with basic verbal skills like reading comprehension, critical thinking, and sentence correction. The questions will vary in difficulty level, and some will require more advanced language skills than others. However, the GMAT is not a test of advanced language knowledge. Instead, it is meant to see how well you can read and understand complicated texts and how well you can use critical thinking to evaluate arguments.
In the VR section, the questions are meant to see how well you can read and understand what’s written and determine the main ideas, assumptions, and implications. The section consists of three types of questions: reading comprehension, critical reasoning, and sentence correction. The reading comprehension questions test how well you can understand difficult written passages and use the information given to answer questions. The essential reasoning questions test your ability to evaluate arguments and pick out assumptions, inferences, and conclusions. The sentence correction questions test your ability to spot grammar mistakes and choose the best answer for making the sentence clearer and better structured.
To perform well in the VR section, it is essential to have a solid understanding of fundamental verbal skills and to be able to apply them to real-world problems. You should also be able to read and analyze complex texts quickly and effectively. You need to practice and study to get a high score on the GMAT VR section.
There are many resources available to help you prepare for the GMAT VR section, including study guides, online courses, and practice tests. It is recommended that you begin preparing for the GMAT at least three months in advance and dedicate a significant amount of time to practicing the types of questions you will see on the test.
In conclusion, the Verbal Reasoning (VR) section of the GMAT is an essential part of the test that evaluates a test-takers ability to read and analyze complex texts and to apply critical reasoning skills. By getting a good grasp of basic verbal skills and practicing the questions you’ll see on the test, you can do well on the GMAT VR section and increase your chances of getting into the graduate business program you want.


The GMAT is a challenging test requiring thorough preparation to achieve a high score. There are many resources available to help you prepare for the GMAT, including study guides, online courses, and practice tests. It would help if you began preparing for the test three months before.
In conclusion, the GMAT is essential for admission into graduate-level business programs. It measures your aptitude in verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing skills and comprehensively evaluates your abilities. With thorough preparation and practice, you can achieve a high score on the GMAT and increase your chances of being accepted into your desired business program.

Here are some official links for the GMAT:

  1. The official GMAT website: https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat
  2. GMAT exam registration: https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat/before-the-exam/register-for-the-gmat-exam
  3. GMAT exam preparation materials: https://www.mba.com/exam-prep/gmat-official-starter-kit-practice-exams-1-and-2-free
  4. GMAT score report: https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat/after-the-exam/gmat-scores-and-score-reports
  5. GMAT test-taking policies and procedures: https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat/before-the-exam/gmat-exam-policies
  6. GMAT FAQs: https://www.mba.com/exams/gmat/about-the-gmat-exam/gmat-exam-faq

Only official resources for GMAT preparation and registration must be used to ensure that you have the most up-to-date and accurate information.

GMAT Date in Nepal

Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) for the GMAT:

What is the GMAT?

The GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) is a standardized test used by graduate-level business programs to assess a candidate’s readiness for their program. The test measures skills in analytical writing, quantitative reasoning, verbal reasoning, and integrated reasoning.

Who takes the GMAT?

The GMAT is taken by individuals who are interested in pursuing a graduate-level business program such as an MBA or a Master’s in Management.

How do I register for the GMAT?

You can register for the GMAT on the official GMAT website at www.mba.com. You will need to create an account, select a test date and location, and pay the registration fee.

What is the format of the GMAT?

The GMAT is a computer-based test that consists of four sections: Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA), Integrated Reasoning (IR), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), and Verbal Reasoning (VR).

How long is the GMAT?

The total time for the GMAT is three hours and seven minutes. The AWA section is 30 minutes, the IR section is 30 minutes, the QR section is 62 minutes, and the VR section is 65 minutes. There are also two optional 8-minute breaks.

What is a good GMAT score?

A good GMAT score depends on the requirements of the program you are applying to. The average GMAT score is around 565. Top business schools usually require a score above 700.

How often can I take the GMAT?

You can take the GMAT once every 16 calendar days, up to five times in a rolling 12-month period.

How long are GMAT scores valid?

GMAT scores are valid for five years.

Can I cancel my GMAT score?

Yes, you can cancel your GMAT score, but it must be done immediately after completing the test before viewing the score. Once you consider your score, it cannot be canceled.

Can I retake the GMAT?

Yes, you can retake the GMAT up to five times in a rolling 12-month period, but you must wait at least 16 calendar days between tests. You must also pay the registration fee each time you take the test.